Bad news for energy drinks

By: Dr. Steve Salvatore, Co-Owner of The American Academy of Personal Training

When you need a quick pick-me-up do you reach for an energy drink?  Think twice.  There are new charges that the popular drinks may not be everything they claim to be.  A study just published in the Journal of Pediatrics found that the drinks did not improve energy, boost weight loss or improve concentration; and they may actually be dangerous.

Those most at risk include children and teens, especially those with a history of diabetes, seizures, and mood and behavior disorders.  Most energy drinks contain between 70-80 mg of caffeine, double that of most cola drinks, as well as guarana – a plant that contains caffeine, taurine – an amino acid, vitamins, herbals supplements and sweeteners.  The American Beverage Association responds, “This literature review does nothing more than perpetuate misinformation about energy drinks, their ingredients and the regulatory process.”

Advertisements